Teaching in Finland – Part 5: Where next?

Background

In my first post on this topic I wrote about how a chance conversation with the host of a study visit led to a really nice teaching project with Kainuu Vocational College (KAO) in Finland.

The main topic of that post was the way that the project moved from idea to something more concrete.

This was followed by an overview of the more technical considerations like lining up the course structure with the requirements of a range of curricula.

Necessary? yes. Fun? no. Such is life.

By way of an antidote the third  post had was a not entirely serious day-by-day look at the ups and downs of the course and the final student presentations.

In general the ups far outweighed the downs, which was great, but at least one of the downs made me wonder if I’d made a big mistake taking on this project.

The fourth post was the stage that most projects leave out: the post project review.

happy-face-2

Let us remember that this applies as much to successful projects, where there are nice lessons to be learned, as well as less successful projects which we can learn the not so nice but oh-so important lessons about what didn’t work and why.

Fortunately in this case the post project review was a happy one.

The positives heavily outweighed the few negatives and there was an unexpected bonus: the Finnish National Board of Education were so impressed with the project that they have asked me to present the project at their Internationalisation Event of Finnish Vocational Education in Tallinn in November.

I think we call safely call that “a result”

So, can what we learned be applied in other situations?

Continue reading “Teaching in Finland – Part 5: Where next?”

Teaching In Finland – Part 4: How I should have done it

Background

In my first post on this topic I wrote about how a chance conversation with the host of a study visit led to a really nice teaching project with Kainuu Vocational College (KAO) in Finland.

The main topic of that post was the way that the project moved from idea to something more concrete.

This was followed by a post on the more technical considerations like lining up the course structure with the requirements of a range of curricula. Necessary? yes. Fun? no. Such is life.

By way of an antidote the third  post had was a not entirely serious day-by-day look at the ups and downs of the course and the final student presentations.

In general the ups far outweighed the downs, which was great, but at least one of the downs made me wonder if I’d made a big mistake taking on this project……..

Continue reading “Teaching In Finland – Part 4: How I should have done it”